Tuesday, 22 October 2013

Nintendo 2DS


Nintendo 2DS, Nintendo 3DS, Nintendo 2DS review

Nintendo 2DS, Nintendo 3DS, Nintendo 2DS review


















Do you have a game console or two at home? We normally play games on the computer so we were never too bothered with game consoles. We sold our PlayStation as it was sitting in the corner covering in dust, but kept our Nintendo Wii as we preferred the games on it (hubby might say otherwise hehe), and Abby has shown interest in it as well when she was about 18 months old. She never really played on it after, until months ago when out of the sudden she has asked whether she can. Like her mummy, she loved the cute Mii characters (Nintendo characters created by players) and games, and her favourite was Harvest Moon: Magical Melody, a game about a farmer's life.

Being a fan of Nintendo games (though we never had a handheld console before), we were really glad that we were given an opportunity to review their latest hand held console - Nintendo 2DS, as well as one of their latest 3DS game - Animal Crossing: New Leaf, which worked on the 2DS as well. I'll post about the game tomorrow. First, lets talk about the 2DS.


Nintendo 2DS, Nintendo 3DS, Nintendo 2DS review

Nintendo 2DS, Nintendo 3DS, Nintendo 2DS review















I think it's safe to say that a lot of young children are playing games, even though it might not be recommended. When I went to Play Expo, I was wondering why there wasn't more attraction/ games for younger children, after all, this market is growing fast. Nintendo, however, has obviously spotted the growth in this market, and I thought that their launch of the 2DS was a very clever move.

To a lot of people who have tried Nintendo's 3DS but aren't familiar with children, they would probably think that the new 2DS is Nintendo going backwards. What they did not realise is that the 2DS is actually designed with younger children in mind, and they have even made it affordable for parents to buy it for that age group.

The 2DS is actually 3DS but without the 3D display, system and function wise it's still very much 3DS, hence it has no problem playing 3DS games. If you prefer to save some money and don't mind the slightly less defined graphics like me, you can even get DS games as those will work as well (I've bought 2 DS games already!). People commented that the creation of 2DS is Nintendo saying that their 3D display isn't good. In my opinion, Nintendo is considering the fact that the 3D feature is unsuitable for children under 7, so they created one that young children can use. 

Unlike the previous models, the 2DS is not foldable. Again, if you have/ had young children, you'll understand that hinges means "will break within weeks". We had a really sturdy musical box but Clay managed to break the thick plastic that's wrapped around the hinges. Even though he's only 2 years old, I wouldn't dare to underestimate his strength! People might think that an unfoldable DS is less convenient for travel. Have you seen the size of a tablet?


Nintendo 2DS, Nintendo 3DS, Nintendo 2DS review



















I've also found a travel pack designed for 2DS being sold on Amazon UK, which includes a hard case that has 6 game card slots and a wrist strap, in-car charger and USB cable, a bigger stylus pen, and 2 screen protectors, all for around £10. With this travel pack, and the fact that the size of the console is still smaller than a 7" tablet, I really don't see it not being able to fold is inconvenient.


The 2DS is overall very sturdy, easy to hold, and if the kids get tired of holding it, the extra height at the top of the console means that the screen is still propped up even if they place it flat on the table. The console gives you a feeling that even if it's dropped on the floor, it will survive. 


Nintendo 2DS, Nintendo 3DS, Nintendo 2DS review
















I think the flimsiest part of the console is the Stylus pen because of how thin it is. The good news is, they are extremely cheap to replace. Having said that, Clay found it amusing to stick the stylus pen into a hole in a stool, and after removing it, only part of the plastic seem to be damaged. Comparing to hubby's Samsung Galaxy Note 2 Stylus pen, which Clay has effortlessly bended, I'd say that the Nintendo one is a pretty strong pen!

I think the only thing that bothers Abby is the need to use the Stylus pen and console controls simultaneously for the games. Although you can use your fingers on the bottom touch screen and for bigger options it works, sometimes the options are too small and only the stylus pen can make them respond. As Abby is used to using one tool at a time, I sometimes find her pressing the A button with the stylus pen. It's funny to watch and it kind of worked out for her, but she'd most likely prefer to play a game without the need for the Stylus pen.


Nintendo 2DS, Nintendo 3DS, Nintendo 2DS review

Nintendo 2DS, Nintendo 3DS, Nintendo 2DS review

Nintendo 2DS, Nintendo 3DS, Nintendo 2DS review

Nintendo 2DS, Nintendo 3DS, Nintendo 2DS review

























Nintendo 2DS, Nintendo 3DS, Nintendo 2DS review






























As mentioned before, system and function wise (apart from the 3D display), the 2DS is pretty much the same as the 3DS. I was impressed with the 3D camera, which allows you to take 3D images, the Augmentation Reality (AR) games that came with the console, where you can play different games using the AR cards (also comes with the console), and especially the Parental Control feature. 

The parental control allows you to control every setting that can be used with the Internet: the Web browser, Eshop, games that can be installed on the console based on its ratings, in game connection to the Internet etc, etc. With my setting, I won't have to worry about accidental purchases, nor my young children meeting strangers in game. It takes part of the fun away, but life is tough.


Seeing that me and Abby have been fighting over the 2DS since day 2 (I let her play on the 1st day), and she has requested for her own 2DS on day 7, you can tell how happy we both are with it. Hubby was a bit skeptical at first, but after having a play, he was really impressed with the much more affordable game console compared to others. He also thought that it's strong and suitable to be used by younger children.

If you are looking into buying a game console for a young child, do consider the 2DS. It's more affordable, and it saves you from the need to fight over your TV. I also think that there are more games on Nintendo that are suitable for younger children than the other consoles, and with the parental control you won't have to worry about them accidentally spending over thousands of pounds within 5 minutes.

Tomorrow I'll be posting up my review on the 3DS game Animal Crossing: New Leaf, which I think is fairly educational. It teaches the player how to pay off their mortgage and save up for other things!


Disclosure: We were sent a game console and a free code to download a game for review purpose; all opinions are honest and our own